Upgrading Nokia X to CyanogenMod 11 (via Ubuntu)

The Nokia X seems to be a nice piece of hardware for just around $125 AUD. Nothing spectacular in terms of computing power, but much better build quality than your average cheap Chinese Android clone. I have always been a fan of Nokia hardware until they decided to commit suicide by firstly adding CEO Stephen Elop and ditching all of their software for Windows Mobile.

The problem with the device out of the box is that is has a horribly butchered version of Android. And by horribly I mean way worse than the usual bloat and crapware that poor Samsung, HTC or Sony users are normally subjected to. Hopefully this is only Nokia’s first step to a more open platform, but I wouldn’t hold my breath on that one.

Before committing to buy this device I made sure that I could flash it to CyanogenMod as soon as it arrives. Sidenote: I purchased from Mobicity AU – which turned out to be a big mistake. Do yourself a favour and go somewhere else unless you have weeks to wait.

Nokia X - CyanogenMod 11

Boot Mode – Nokia X

Nokia Recovery Mode:

1. Turn off your device
2. Press Volume + and Power Button 15 seconds

Dependencies

If you haven’t got the Android SDK or tools yet you need to install

sudo apt-get install android-tools-adb android-tools-fastboot

USB Configuration

sudo vim /etc/udev/rules.d/51-android.rules
#add the following line
SUBSYSTEMS=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0421", MODE="0666", OWNER="plugdev"
sudo service udev restart

vim ~/.android/adb_usb.ini
#add at the end of the file
0x0421

sudo adb kill-server
sudo adb devices

Rooting the device

Download ClockWorkMod Recovery (or TWRP if you prefer).

http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2703708

Check USB debugging in “Settings –> Developer Options” (it seems that the NokiaX has debugging enabled out of the box)

Boot into Recovery (see above)

sudo adb reboot bootloader
sudo fastboot -i 0×0421 flash recovery cwm-6028-normandy.img
sudo fastboot reboot

Installing CyanogenMod 11

Please note that currently this is not an official CM release but an unofficial port, however CM has already committed to taking this device onboard as an officially supported one in the near future.

EDIT 2014-06-17: WIFI is currently not working which should be a showstopper for day-to-day use.

Boot into Recovery (see above) – this should now be CWM Recovery rather than the previous Android Recovery.

Download files:
CM 11 ROM for Nokia X (Android 4.4.2)
Google Apps for CM 11

EDIT (2014-09-29): There seems to be a more complete version of CM11 here: http://forum.xda-developers.com/nokia-x/development/rom-cyanogenmod-11-m8-4-4-4-t2838336

In CWM recovery, select “Data Wipeout / Factory reset” option and wipe the data.
Select “Wipe Dalvik cache” from the Advanced Option
Select “Install ZIP –> Install ZIP from sideload”

sudo adb sideload cm-11-20140426-UNOFFICIAL-normandy.zip

Select “Reboot system now”

Note: the reboot can take about 1 minute to get started due to a bug in the current CWM Recovery.

Enjoy !

EDIT 2014-07-22: Since there doesn’t seem to be any active development on the CM port for Nokia X (which seems a shame since they are so cheap) I found an AOSP ROM (based on Android 4.1.2) which seems to be workable as a day-to-day phone.
ROM Download: http://loki.rombitch.com/Devs/Dhacker29/NokiaX/msm8625-ota-eng.dhacker29-custom.zip
Discussion: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2710107

Nokia Bluetooth Keyboard on Android

One of my oldest pieces of hardware is a trusty Nokia SU-8W Bluetooth Keyboard. I have tried to revive it on an Android 1.6 & 2.0 device with not much luck. However I got it working successfully on a Gingerbread (2.3.4) Google Nexus S.

Pre-requisites

Steps

  1. Install the BlueKeyboard JP from the Android Market
  2. Go to Settings > Wireless & Networks > Bluetooth Settings
  3. Scan for devices and click to pair the Nokia SU-8W
  4. Enter a passcode (I used the highly inventive 0000 combinaton) on the phone and click ‘OK’
  5. Enter the same on the SU-8W (need to use green ‘fn’ keys for numbers) and hit enter
  6. The phone should show the Nokia SU-8W as paired but not connected
  7. Go to Settings > Language & keyboard > BlueKeyboard JP Settings
  8. Select the Nokia SU-8W as the keyboard and make any other changes you might need
  9. Click the ‘Back’ symbol and tick the option box to enable the ‘BlueKeyboard JP’ keyboard
  10. In any data entry field (i.e. GMail) hold the finger on the input box and click ‘Input method’ and select BlueKeyboard JP
  11. Wait for the keyboard to connect.

 

Enjoy !

 

Using Nokia Share Online to upload directly to Flickr

One of the nicest ways to get photos straight from your mobile to Flickr (without having to use e-mails) on Nokia devices is the Flickr Plugin for the Nokia Share Online application. Since a lot of my clients in the educational sector  are starting to use Flickr as part of their online teaching I decided to create a short HOWTO.

The application itself comes with the phone on most recent Nokia S60 devices (with recent Firmware – check Nokia Software Updater for new firmware). To check if your particular phone is capable you can check the Nokia Share Online Support site.

Nokia Share Online appears on the home screen of your device (screenshots are from a N95 8GB):

Home Screen
Home Screen

First time only configuration

On first use you will have to check the available services by choosing ‘Options’:

Update Service
Update Service
Activate Service
Activate Service

On a new device you will be prompted for your Flickr Username / Password. Since I have used the Flickr Plugin on this particular phone previously the Username was already saved (which is a bit of a worry – since deleting the account should have also removed the credentials I would have hoped).

Select Access Point
Select Access Point
Activate Website 1
Activate Website 1
Activate Website 2
Activate Website 2
Accept Conditions
Accept Conditions

Set the update frequency:

Update interval
Update interval

NOTE: Be careful with this setting as there could be mobile data fees involved depending on the method you use to connect to the internet on your device. Consult with your network operator on the fees if you are using the wireless data network of your phone provider.

After this step you are ready to connect to Flickr and sync your recent fotos:

Sync recent
Sync recent

Create Flickr Post

Once the service has been set up you can create post using the following steps:

New Post
New Post

Adding the Post Title and Description.

Post Title
Post Title
Insert Image(s)
Insert Image(s)
Choose Image
Choose Image
Tags
Tags

You can coose from a list of previously used tags (or create new ones).

Choose Existing Tags
Choose Existing Tags

Finally you can post to the web:

Choose Existing Tags
Choose Existing Tags

Your post is now being uploaded and should be available via your Flickr Photostream (mine is on http://www.flickr.com/photos/leogaggl/) soon. The upload time will depend on the size of the image and the speed of your data connection.

Enjoy !

Mobile 2D codes gathering pace (outside of Asia)

FINALLY !!! As somebody that has been experimenting with this technology for over 2 years now I am quite exited to see that the adoption of this technology is gathering some steem. While it has bee widely adopted in Asia for some years now, it has taken some time to get a foothold in the rest of the world this seems to be changing now. At least in Europe as I can see for myself at the moment. In my opinion with Nokia finally getting serious and throwing its (considerable) weight behind this technology (http://mobilecodes.nokia.com/) and some other industry heavyweights joining forces in the Mobile Codes Consortium.� This will hopefully produce one key outcome, the stadardisation of the label technology, which up to now has been one of the stumbling blocks that has kept people such as myself from adopting these codes in real-world projects. Along with the adoption by some major companies in their advertising this should produce the momentum that was needed to push mobile 2D codes into some broad adoption.

Of course there is similar technology available for the applications that require this link between the physical world (presence) and the mobile internet. One example is RFID together with Near Field Communications (NFC). However apart from the additional expense for RFID labels, no other technology has anywhere close the number of handsets that are capable of using this technology without some add-on to the mobile phone. Currently there are only very few handsets that will support this technology. Possible use in m-Payment projects might speed up the process of handset manufacturers including this in their handsets, but that will be some way off. 2D codes are here and now.

datamatrix

Looks like I will dig out some of the pilot projects out of my (virtual) drawers and see if we can get some interest in them. The project that will most likely be the first is a m-Learning implementation using 2D codes together with the Moodle Learning Managment System which is our preferred LMS.

Let’s see if Australia is also ready to move on this technology ….

Using Nokia Mobile Webserver in an educational environment.

The ability to host your own content from your mobile phone opens some interesting possibilities to engage students and will allow the integration of user generated content in the education process. David Johnson from the University of Reading is working on serving portfolio data from your mobile.

Some of the current limitation of this approach:

-cost of the bandwidth
-speed

The ability to proxy the users content on the Mobile Web server Gateway as well as the ability to integrate content outside of the mobile phone seem to be the main points that will have to be improved for this to become a more mainstream technology. Another area of concern (or another potential use of this technology – depending on your viewpoint) is the backup of data from the mobile phone. The ability to proxy the content on the Gateway could also be used as a backup of the content that is hosted within the MWS on the mobile phone.

Some of this work is already on the way. David Johnson (see above) is currently working on some Webservice API for MWS that should allow the use of MWS served content in mashups with other content sources.

Configuring the Nokia E-Series SIP for Nodephone (Internode)

This is Part 3 of the Nokia SIP settings. This time for NodePhone (Internode – Australia). It has been hard to find this information (particularily the Registrar Server settings). NOTE: The Realm setting in the Registrar Server are CASE-SENSITIVE. For some screenshots check the ENGIN Australia setup entry.

General

Profile name: nodephone

Service profile: IETF

Default access point: {Your WLAN Access Point}

Public user name: sip:{NodePhone Phone No}@sip.internode.on.net

User compression: No

Registration: When needed

Use security: No

Proxy Server (not required)

Proxy Server Address: none

Realm: none

Username: none

Password: none

Allow loose routing: none

Transport Type: none

Port : none

Registrar Server:

Registrar Server Address: sip:203.2.134.1

Realm: BroadWorks (Note:CASE-SENSITIVE)

User name: {NodePhone Phone No}

Password: *****

Transport type: UDP

Port : 5060

Configuring the Nokia E-Series SIP for sipgate.at

This is Part 2 of the Nokia SIP settings. This time for sipgate.at
(Austria), but it should also work for other SIPGate domains. It has
been hard to get this information from the providers themselves. For
some screenshots check the ENGIN Australia setup entry.

General

Profile name: sipgate
Service profile: IETF
Default access point: {Your WLAN Access Point}
Public user name: sip:{SIPGate UserID}@sipgate.at
User compression: No
Registration: When needed
Use security: No

Proxy Server

Proxy Server Address: sip:sipgate.at
Realm: sipgate.at
Username: {SIPGate UserID}
Password: *****
Allow loose routing: Yes
Transport Type: UDP
Port : 5060

Registrar Server:

Registrar Server Address: sip:sipgate.at
Realm: sipgate.at
User name: {SIPGate UserID}
Password: *****
Transport type: UDP
Port : 5060

Configuring the Nokia E-Series VoIP client for Engin Australia

Since I had to look all over�for the correct settings and there was a
lot of trial and error involved (specially for the Realm). Thanks to Engin Support that finally provided this info after logging a support request.

The screenshots are from a Nokia E65, but should be applicable for similar Nokia phones.

Screenshot 1
Screenshot 1

General

Profile name: engin
Service profile: IETF
Default access point: {Your WLAN Access Point}
Public user name: sip:{phone number}@voice.mibroadband.com.au
User compression: No
Registration: When needed
Use security: No

Screenshot 2
Screenshot 2
Screenshot 3
Screenshot 3

Proxy Server

Proxy Server Address: byo.engin.com.au
Realm: mobileinnovations.com.au
Username: {your engin phone number}
Password: *****
Allow loose routing: Yes
Transport Type: UDP
Port : 5060

Screenshot 4
Screenshot 4
Screenshot 5
Screenshot 5

Registrar Server:

Registrar Server Address: byo.engin.com.au
Realm: mobileinnovations.com.au
User name: {your engin phone number}
Password: *****
Transport type: UDP
Port : 5060

Screenshot 6
Screenshot 6