Accessing 1-wire devices on Raspberry Pi using OWFS

To connect 1-wire serial devices to the RPi I am using a DS9490R USB 1-wire adapter (rather than wiring I2C 1-Wire master components to GPIO I2C - which I might look at sometime down the track) Install packages sudo apt-get install owfs ow-shell Edit config file vim /etc/owfs.conf ! server: server = localhost:4304 # USB device: DS9490 server: usb = all ######################### OWFS ########################## mountpoint = /mnt/1wire allow_other ####################### OWHTTPD ######################### http: port = 2121 ####################### OWFTPD ########################## ftp: port = 2120 ####################### OWSERVER ######################## server: port = localhost:4304 Create Startup Script I created a startup script for owfs modelled on the owserver script (not sure why this one is actually missing) vim /etc/init.d/owfs #!/bin/sh ### BEGIN INIT INFO # Provides: owfs # Required-Start: $remote_fs $syslog $network $named # Required-Stop: $remote_fs $syslog $network $named # Should-Start: owfs # Should-Stop: owfs # Default-Start: 2 3 4 5 # Default-Stop: 0 1 6 # Short-Description: 1-wire file system mount & update daemon # Description: Start and stop 1-wire file system mount & update daemon. ### END INIT INFO CONFFILE=/etc/owfs.conf DESC="1-Wire file system mount" NAME="owfs" DAEMON=/usr/bin/$NAME case "$1" in start) echo "Starting $NAME" $DAEMON -c $CONFFILE ;; stop) echo "Stopping $NAME" killall $NAME ;; *) echo "Usage: $N {start|stop}" >&2 exit 1 ;; esac exit 0 Starting daemons /etc/init.d/owserver start /etc/init.d/owfs start Checking output #ls /mnt/1wire/ Should show output similar to: 10.575349000000 12.95DD17000000 alarm simultaneous uncached 10.575349000000 12.95DD17000000 bus.0 statistics 12.57DD16000000 81.B2EA2E000000 bus.1 structure 12.57DD16000000 81.B2EA2E000000 settings system cat /mnt/1wire/10.575349000000/temperature Will then show…

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Installing OMXPlayer on Raspberry Pi

Since I didn't have any luck playing videos on the RPi using mplayer I found omxplayer after some search. It has the ability to use the RPi's GPU thus taking some load of the CPU. UPDATE 2013-04-01: omxplayer is now included in the Raspbian (Debian Wheezy) repositories and can be simply installed by one line. sudo apt-get install omxplayer Check another article on how to install Raspbian. OMXPlayer binary (.deb) downloads can be found here: http://omxplayer.sconde.net/ Install dependencies apt-get install libpcre3 fonts-freefont-ttf fbset libpcre3-dev libpcrecpp0 libva-dev libva-x11-1 libva1 Install omxplayer wget http://omxplayer.sconde.net/builds/omxplayer_0.2.4~git20121205~ec7ac68f_armhf.deb dpkg -i omxplayer_0.2.4~git20121205~ec7ac68f_armhf.deb Play video omxplayer -o hdmi video.mp4 Note: If there is no sound when playing through the HDMI interface make sure your /boot/config.txt file has the following line (and it's not commented out). hdmi_drive = 2 OMXPlayer Key bindings Key Action 1 Increase Speed 2 Decrease Speed j Previous Audio stream k Next Audio stream i Previous Chapter o Next Chapter n Previous Subtitle stream m Next Subtitle stream s Toggle subtitles q Exit OMXPlayer Space or p Pause/Resume - Decrease Volume + Increase Volume Left Seek -30 Right Seek +30 Down Seek -600 Up Seek +600

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Raspberry Pi – Text to Speech

Just a quick note on Speech Synthesis a Raspberry Pi project. I had to research some of the options on the Raspberry Pi while looking into a project where I need some audio announcements. Configuring Sound echo 'snd-bcm2835' >> /etc/modules sudo modprobe snd-bcm2835 sudo apt-get install mplayer alsa-base alsa-utils pulseaudio mpg123 # make mplayer use mpg123 codec instead of default ffmp3float echo "afm=mp3lib" >> ~/.mplayer/config Since I am using Raspbian which is a Debian based (Wheezy) Distribution I used some Ubuntu documentation (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/TextToSpeech) as the starting point. Festival sudo apt-get install festival festival-english echo "Hello World - Testing" | festival --tts Plus: Local install (no internet connection required) Minus: Mechanical sounding voice Espeak sudo apt-get install espeak espeak -v en "Hello World - Testing" Plus: Local install (no internet connection required) Minus: Mechanical sounding voice (slightly better than Festival) Google Translate Create a shell script tts.sh #!/bin/bash mplayer -ao alsa -noconsolecontrols "http://translate.google.com/translate_tts?tl=en&q=$*" > /dev/null 2>&1 chmot +x tts.sh ./tts.sh "Hello World - Testing" Plus: needs live internet connection Minus: excellent human sounding voice Google Speech API I will most likely look at this in the long run to get better control rather than calling the Google Translate url too much.

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